Professor Harold Koh: International Law in the 21st century

Professor Harold Koh: International Law in the 21st century
Event date: 
11 Jul 2013 1:00pm
Venue: 
Lecture Theatre G02, Law Buiilding (ground floor)
Topic: 
International Law in the 21st century
Speaker: 
Professor Harold Koh
Position: 
Sterling Professor of International Law, Yale Law School, former Legal Adviser to the US Department of State
Cost: 
Free

The AHRCentre and UNSW Law invite you to a lecture by Professor Harold Koh
Sterling Professor of International Law, Yale Law School; former Legal Adviser to the US Department of State on

International Law in the 21st century

21st century lawmaking is not limited to traditional “lawmaking” in the sense of drafting codes and static texts, so much as it is a process of building relationships to foster normative principles in new issue areas, leading to “soft law,” “regime-building,” and sometimes eventually crystallizing into legal norms….[I]t includes a living, breathing human tapestry of meetings, relationships, and other communications — personal and virtual — all focused on the broader tasks of promoting cooperation, engagement and norm-promotion. .. The story is neither simple nor static. Twenty-first century international lawmaking has become a swirling interactive process whereby norms get “uploaded” from one country into the international system, and then “downloaded” elsewhere into another country’s laws or even a private actor’s internal rules. - Harold Hongju Koh, Remarks at the Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, DC, 17 October  2012.

About Professor Harold Koh
Professor Koh is one of the United States' leading experts in public and private international law, national security law, and human rights. He first began teaching at Yale Law School in 1985 and served as Dean from 2004 until 2009, when he took leave as the Martin R. Flug ’55 Professor of International Law to join the State Department. From 1993 to 2009, he was the Gerard C & Bernice Latrobe Smith Professor of International Law at Yale Law School, and from 1998 to 2001, he served as US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy,Human Rights and Labor.